9 comments
Gwydyr
Gwydyr

I’ve had a soft spot in my heart from black labs all my life.  When my mom went into labor with me, she was making cupcakes for our black Lab’s birthday.  Needless to say, Jaffey (all 120 pounds of him) and I were inseparable!

Flash forward a few decades:   About a year after losing a wonderful German Shepherd that had been with me for 12 years, I was ready for a BFF (best furry friend), again.  I started looking at PetFinders.com frequently for a black or chocolate Lab or mix.  One day, as I was scrolling through, I saw a picture of an adorable black Lab at the Minidoka Animal Control Facility. All the description said was “Cage 6.  3-5 year old male black Lab.”  Something about him tugged at my heartstrings.  I wasn’t able to take on a dog with any behavioral issues or significant health issues so I kept scrolling down the page hoping for more information.  The profile right below “Cage 6” was a female black Lab with a very informative description – she sounded perfect.  I contacted the foster ‘mom’, Liz, about the female. 

Liz emailed me back later that day to say the female had been adopted, but she’d keep her ears and eyes open for a Lab with a similar temperament.  Two days later, at 9pm on a Friday, Liz called me to say she found the perfect dog, about a year old, a little undernourished, but in good health, and super sweet.  He was in the Minidoka Facility, but he was scheduled to be euthanized the next morning.  She emailed me his picture - it was “Cage 6”! 

I was fostering a Doberman at the time through Guardian Angles for Soldiers' Pets.  Oni was a sweetheart, but not dog friendly.  I knew I was supposed to bring “Cage 6” home, but couldn’t just then.  Liz and her husband, with the help of Waggin Tails Rescue, said they’d foster “Cage 6” for the 2 more weeks I would have Oni until her people came home from Afghanistan.  Liz and Kevin literally saved “Cage 6” mere hours before he was to be killed.  (Another example of Black Dog Syndrome – he had only been in the facility a week.)

That was almost 3 years ago.  “Cage 6” became my dear Watson.  He’s such a love, if not a little rambunctious in that fabulous Labrador way.  We hike, backpack, snowshoe, and cuddle together ever chance we get.  He is my first rescue (certainly not my last), and the most affectionate dog I’ve ever had.  He seems very grateful to be loved.  I’m sure he adores me at least as much as I adore him.  We were meant to be together.   


ayrwolf123
ayrwolf123

February 2009 just a couple weeks before our second annual "SPAY" ghetti No Balls fundraiser I lost 3 of my 4 senior dogs to old age.  I was heartbroken and a local rescue group thought I should adopt young dogs for a change.  So over the period of 3 months my household was filled with 3 young full of energy whipper snaps.  Scruffy a Carin Terrier Doxie mix who was found walking the streets of Paul Idaho and unclaimed was the first and was pretty well behaved until the second came along.  Hamper a black (gosh knows what) wasfound in a hamper, behind a closed door in an empty hotel and is a fisty little guy.  Hamper if he had is way will attack everything and his behavior rubs off on his brother and sister.  Charcoal the blackest black miniature poodle I have ever see came from a Salt Lake shelter that was closing and killing all the dogs.  None were housebroken and each with a diverse personality. We had a hayday learning how to cohabit with our 4 cats.  Charcoal was totally stress living with siblings and after trying everything we could, except taking the advise of several to put him down, a new home where he was the only 4 legged occupant was found and he is loving living the life of only dog in the household.  Our home has settled down with the young canine dual that has learned that their restroom is outside and the cats are not to chase.  I would not  advise anyone adopt a dog, better yet three sight unseen, but I sure would not trade mine for anything now that the rocky times are over.

Royal Pet Care LLC
Royal Pet Care LLC

One of our Clients Emailed this Tail: 

By Chuck Malloy

If Butterball could talk, he’d tell one of the most incredible stories you’d ever hear. But since cats can’t talk, or write, I’ll have to tell this story for him.

Several years ago, we saw this little black and white, shorthair kitty   roaming around near the back door of our house. We didn’t think much about it, because he had a collar and appeared to be well fed. After a few months, our neighbors looked at his collar and found a telephone number. As it turned out, the family moved and left their cat behind. Meanwhile, Butterball was growing and the collar was getting tighter around his neck. Judge the action for yourself. But other than the tight collar, Butterball was doing well. His home base was the neighbor’s patio, but he was getting handouts from other places – including our house.

Butterball seemed very content as an outdoor kitty; only he knows how he survived cold winters. We invited him inside for short periods, but he didn’t want to stay long and he preferred to have his meals outside, thank you. One day in January, we invited him inside the house and notice he was bleeding from his back side, near the base of his tail. After a few days, the wound appeared to be getting worse and it was apparent to us that he would die if the wound was left untreated.

So we loaded him into a crate and took him to the Cat Doctor, where they boarded him and monitored his progress. They wanted to observe how he would adjust to being an indoor kitty. Would he use a litter box? Would he be prone to spraying? There were no issues. We had him neutered and brought him home with us, where he quickly adjusted to sleeping on a green blanket on our bed and piles of blankets on the couch.

By the way, we also adopted a little brother for him – an orange tabby (we call him Bronco) who is about a year and a half old. His owners had to give him up because they moved. It was their loss, our gain and most importantly – Butterball’s gain. The little guys get along fine, frequently entertaining us with “kitty wrestling.” The morning feeding has turned into “show time,” with both kitties following me into the kitchen for a nice heaping helping of Friskies or Fancy Feast.

So as stories go, this one has a familiar end. Butterball and Bronco are living happily ever after, and so are we.

SamanthaParrott
SamanthaParrott

I began working at the Idaho Humane Society in January of this year.  During my first month at the shelter I would search the kennels each day looking for the perfect dog to join our family.  I felt discouraged that I hadn't found a good match so I decided we were not ready to adopt a dog yet.  Later in the week someone mentioned we had a litter of puppies come in to the shelter.  I headed down to check them out.  I rounded the corner and laid eyes on the most beautiful puppy I have ever seen.  He was a 3.5 month old German Shepard/Alaskan Malamute mix.  Out of the other 4 puppies, he was the most calm.  He looked at me and I knew that we were meant to be together.  I adopted him on the spot and we later named him Bentley.  About a week after we adopted him, he was diagnosed with Parvovirus and had to return to the IHS for treatment.  We almost lost our sweet pup but he pulled through.  Our precious puppy is now 5 months old and weighs 45 pounds (he is going to be a big boy).  We absolutely love him and I am so glad I waited until I found the perfect fit for our family. 

LauraEvansMiskiv
LauraEvansMiskiv

In July of 2010, our kids talked us into letting them bring home two kittens from their uncle's farm in Montana, which they named Charlie and Kiara.  Sadly, the little female, Kiara, ended up getting sick, tested positive for FIV, and after a hard fight, succumbed to a respiratory virus.  My daughter was heartbroken at the loss of her sweet little kitten and little Charlie was lost without a buddy to play with.  We went to a couple of places to look at kittens but none were the right one.  Late on a Friday afternoon, my daughter asked to go to The Humane Society before it closed.  We were in the Cattery looking at all of the cats, when she saw a kitten in a kennel outside of the room in the hallway and went to check it out.  It was love at first site.  The sweet little 8 week old kitten wouldn't let go of my daughter and the feeling was mutual.  She immediately knew that this was the kitten who would heal her broken heart. The amazing thing was that the kitten was in foster care and was only at the Humane Society that day because the foster mom was volunteering.  If we had gone to the shelter any other time, we would not have seen her.  We adopted her and named her Sasha and she is truly  a sweetheart.  She was the same age as Charlie so was a perfect companion for him and they are the best of friends.

LouiseDolan
LouiseDolan

Holly dog came to us from Border Collie Trust. She came into reception and hid under a chair throughout the entire adoption process. She bonded with me in 2 days but it took 3 weeks before she would let my husband touch her. Now they are best buddies and life wouldn't be the same without her! We now raise money for Border Collie Trust with our website http://www.roverrecommended.com

CaseyOConnell
CaseyOConnell

How cool!  Thanks for this opportunity.  Let me tell you about our latest rescue, Rocket:

My family and I already had two great dogs that we'd rehomed from families that were unable to keep their pets for various reasons, and posted them for adoption on Craigslist.  We have a golden retriever, Daisy, and a springer spaniel, Loki.  But I grew up with a much-loved pit bull in our home, and have long wanted to find one for our family. 

My daughter and I did some "unofficial" volunteering at the Idaho Humane Society, because at 7 years old, she's too young to sign up as a regular volunteer.  We spent quite a few hours going and meeting some of the pit bulls there at the shelter, and we'd take them out to the yard and play with them and give them lots of snuggles.  On our way home from our first day there, she said, "That was the greatest day of my life!"  I said, "Better than when we went to Disneyland?" and she said, "I think it was just as good."  I can't tell you how good that made me feel.

But it was terrible to leave some of these wonderful dogs behind us when we went home.  I talked my husband into being open-minded about considering a third dog, but knew the biggest obstacle was our homeowner's association.  Our subdivision's covenants only allow two dogs per home.  I wanted to adopt a pit from the shelter so much that I decided to just submit a polite letter asking them to please consider giving us a one-time waiver, explaining that we had spent a lot of time at the shelter and wanted to give a dog there its forever home.  Much to my surprise, they granted my request!

Our family went to IHS in March, and the very first dog we saw when we walked into C Kennel was Rocket, a small, white male pit bull.  He came right up to the door and sniffed our fingers, and my heart was just lost.  We took him out to the yard and played with him, and discovered that while he really liked to play, what he liked the most was cuddling up on our laps and licking our faces.  He was gentle, great on the leash, and took treats from our daughter so very carefully.  We all agreed that we needed to add him to our family.

As we were finishing up the adoption paperwork, many volunteers came by the front desk area and exclaimed, "You're adopting Rocket!  I'll miss him so much; he's just the best dog."  And he really has been.  He has so much love to give, and for every bit of love he gives us, he gets it back times three.

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  1. […] few years ago we held our first Pet Adoption Story contest and the winning story selected Waggin’ Tails Animal Rescue to be the winner. This year we are […]